Termini Imerese Stories

Father Delisi's Chronicles of his trip to Termini Imerese, September 2002



Chronicle #5 (My impression of the spirituality of Termini.) This will probably be the final chronicle of my recent visit to Termini Imerese. For those who are not interested in my views of the faith in Termini, then I suggest that this chronicle be omitted. Ken and others might be concerned, for the Catholic faith has been put of the culture of our forefathers. Bells! Bells seem to ring out during the day and night. I imagine the average person in Termini is deaf to these sounds, but I kept hearing them ring out as a call to prayer, be it at the beginning of the day with the Angelus, midday, or evening. The bells could be heard at one time coming from the Cathedral of Saint Nicola di Bari, known as the "Dioma,"and at other times from another part of the city. Twenty years ago I discovered master pieces of art, busts of Our Lady made of marble hidden back in the corners of side chapels. No longer did I find them. Where did they go? The plaster of Paris statues chipped and with broken pieces and missing fingers made in the last century still line the sides of the churches. A sign of a devotion that seems long to have died, and yet these relics of plaster of Paris remain. Many of the painting are of high quality. In some sense the faith seems very alive, and yet in another it seems like remnants of what once must have been a vibrant reality. The Mass attendance on Sunday seemed good. On Sunday evening my relatives drove me to Altavilla to visit once again the Sanctuary of the Madonna of Milicia. The church was filled to capacity. There people ascend behind the altar to touch the image of Our Lady with the Christ Child and Saint Francis. Three babies were baptized during the concelebrated Mass. The music was fair. On Monday evening the Feasta for the upcoming Feast of Saint Francis (Oct. 4th) began. In front of the Church of San Francisco was built a stage and that evening a talented group of youth performed their dances. At the break the PA system blasted out American music common for teenagers. With this I bring these chronicles to a close hoping that Gloria and Charles Otto will share with us their experiences. Chronicle #5
(My impression of the spirituality of Termini.)
This will probably be the final chronicle of my recent visit to Termini Imerese. For those who are not interested in my views of the faith in Termini, then I suggest that this chronicle be omitted. Ken and others might be concerned, for the Catholic faith has been put of the culture of our forefathers.
Bells! Bells seem to ring out during the day and night. I imagine the average person in Termini is deaf to these sounds, but I kept hearing them ring out as a call to prayer, be it at the beginning of the day with the Angelus, midday, or evening. The bells could be heard at one time coming from the Cathedral of Saint Nicola di Bari, known as the "Dioma,"and at other times from another part of the city.
Twenty years ago I discovered master pieces of art, busts of Our Lady made of marble hidden back in the corners of side chapels. No longer did I find them. Where did they go? The plaster of Paris statues chipped and with broken pieces and missing fingers made in the last century still line the sides of the churches. A sign of a devotion that seems long to have died, and yet these relics of plaster of Paris remain. Many of the painting are of high quality.
In some sense the faith seems very alive, and yet in another it seems like remnants of what once must have been a vibrant reality.
The Mass attendance on Sunday seemed good.
On Sunday evening my relatives drove me to Altavilla to visit once again the Sanctuary of the Madonna of Milicia. The church was filled to capacity. There people ascend behind the altar to touch the image of Our Lady with the Christ Child and Saint Francis. Three babies were baptized during the concelebrated Mass. The music was fair.
On Monday evening the Feasta for the upcoming Feast of Saint Francis (Oct. 4th) began. In front of the Church of San Francisco was built a stage and that evening a talented group of youth performed their dances. At the break the PA system blasted out American music common for teenagers.
With this I bring these chronicles to a close hoping that Gloria and Charles Otto will share with us their experiences.


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